Herakleios

   Emperor (610-641); son of the exarch of Carthage (qq.v.), also named Herakleios. This younger Herakleios sailed from Carthage with a fleet that overthrew the tyrant Phokas (q.v.). During the first decade of his reign the Persians (q.v.) handed him a series of military reverses, including the capture of Jerusalem (q.v.) in 614, and in 618 the first stages of the Persian annexation of Egypt (which lasted unitl 629). Indicative of the general despair was Herakleios's proposal to return to Carthage, something the patriarch Sergios I (qq.v.) dissuaded him from doing. Finally, in 622 the emperor launched a series of heroic campaigns against Chosroes II (q.v.) that kept the emperor away from Constantinople for almost a decade. When the Persians and Avars (q.v.) attacked the city in 626, patriarch Sergios had to lead its defense. The following year Herakleios inflicted a crushing blow on Persian armies at Ninevah. The collapse of the Persian state in 630 and restoration of the Holy Cross (q.v.) ended four centuries of intermittent warfare between Byzantium and Persia (qq.v.). However, the fruits of Herakleios's great victory evaporated with the victory of the Arabs (q.v.) in 636 at the battle of Yarmuk (q.v.). When Herakleios died the Arabs controlled Syria, Armenia, Mesopotamia, and Egypt (qq.v.). Herakleios's final years were a dismal story of relentless Arab expansion and of court intrigues by his second wife (and niece) Martina (q.v.), who aimed at gaining succession for her son Heraklonas (q.v.). There were also vain attempts to pacify the adherents to Monophysitism, and to resolve controversies over Monoenergism, Monotheletism (qq.v.), and, finally, Herakleios's own Ekthesis (q.v.).

Historical Dictionary of Byzantium . .

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Herakleios — Herakleios,   Heraclius, griechisch Herạkleios, byzantinischer Kaiser (seit 610), * in Kappadokien um 575, ✝ Konstantinopel 11. 2. 641; aus einem armenischen Geschlecht, das sich auf die Arsakiden zurückführte. Herakleios stürzte 610 den… …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Herakleios [1] — Herakleios, der fünfte Monat im Kalender der Bithynier, vom 24. Jan. bis 20. Febr …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Herakleios [2] — Herakleios, oströmischer Kaiser, s. Heraklios …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Herakleios — Solidus des Herakleios mit seinen Söhnen Konstantin III. und Heraklonas. Herakleios (lateinisch Flavius Heraclius; griechisch Φλάβιος Ἡράκλειος, Flavios Iraklios; * um 575; † 11. Februar 641) …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Herakleios der Ältere — († um 611 in Karthago) war der Vater des byzantinischen Kaisers Herakleios. Er war vermutlich gebürtiger Armenier und der erste nachgewiesene Angehörige der Herakleischen Dynastie, die mit der Ermordung von Tiberios, des sechsjährigen Sohnes von… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Ekthesis —    Herakleios s (q.v.) futile attempt, by edict in 638, to find a formula that would reconcile the Monophysites (q.v.) with those who adhered to the teachings of the Fourth Ecumenical Council at Chalcedon (qq.v.). This had become a particularly… …   Historical dictionary of Byzantium

  • Ираклий — (Herákleios)         (575, Каппадокия, 11.2.641, Константинополь), византийский император с 610. Захватил власть в период глубокого внутреннего и внешнеполитического кризиса империи. И. удалось временно упрочить положение империи: в 626 было… …   Большая советская энциклопедия

  • Heraclius — Solidus des Herakleios mit seinen Söhnen Konstantin III. und Heraklonas. Herakleios (griechisch Flavios Heraklios Φλάβιος Ἡράκλειος, lat. Flavius Heraclius; …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Heraklios — Solidus des Herakleios mit seinen Söhnen Konstantin III. und Heraklonas. Herakleios (griechisch Flavios Heraklios Φλάβιος Ἡράκλειος, lat. Flavius Heraclius; …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Persisch-römische Kriege — Über Jahrhunderte stellten das Römische bzw. Oströmische Reich und das neupersische Sassanidenreich die beiden vorherrschenden Staatengebilde im Mittelmeerraum und im Vorderen Orient dar. Obwohl es zwischen den beiden spätantiken Großmächten… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.